Mary Johnson

The DOE's Carol Battershell announces her next big move

Blog Post created by Mary Johnson on Jun 18, 2018

Carol Battershell We’ve got some news in the world of high-ranking women in energy: Carol Battershell, principal deputy director in the Office of Policy at the Department of Energy, is taking early retirement from the federal government. Her last day in the office was Friday, June 15.

 

“I am proud to have been a public servant and been able to contribute to many important and significant initiatives over my 10 years at DOE,” Carol said in a statement. “I am also thrilled about my next phase.”

 

Carol will be moving back to her home state of Ohio, to a new house that “views a protected wetlands and a wide river where bald eagles fly by.” However she is seeking to augment her more relaxed pace of life with director roles on boards for public energy companies.

 

Carol, a speaker this year at HERWorld Energy Forum, has spent 35 years in energy, beginning as an environmental engineer in a refinery in Ohio and then working her way through various roles in conventional and alternative energy. She was drawn to her work in the DOE for the opportunity to marry industry expertise and policy work.

 

“I saw how companies could be hurt by the lack of regulatory certainty and absence of policies that really understood the industry,” Carol told us back in March.

 

During her time at the DOE, she led multibillion-dollar technical programs. She ran the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy field operations office, which at its peak was responsible for approximately $7 billion in grants, research and construction. She was also a key contributor on two multi-agency policy reviews, The Quadrennial Energy Reviews.

 

And she’s been a champion for women at each step of the way: She is an ambassador in the C3E women in energy organization, and watch for announcements coming soon about other volunteer efforts with Pink Petro.

 

“I am excited about the progress I have seen over my 35-year career in energy. There are many more women in the energy field, which shows an improvement. And just the presence of more women, for me, improves the work environment,” Carol says. “An area I see for further progress is bringing more men into helping and seeing that issues like diversity and work-life balance are important for them, too.”

 

Congrats to Carol for all you have accomplished, and all you will do in your next chapter!

 

Click here to read our full interview with Carol from earlier this year.

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