David Feldman

Productivity In The Workplace:  Women vs. Men

Blog Post created by David Feldman Champion on Apr 12, 2017

As a man, I’ll be the first to admit, women are more productive than men.  Here are three characteristics women possess that may make them more productive both in and out of a workplace. 

 

Women Are Becoming Better Educated Than Men

 

More women are choosing to pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees than men.   Education of any kind should, in turn, generally increases productivity.  When an employee chooses to actively seek learning through formal secondary education, new policies, procedures, or responsibilities in the workplace can be more easily assimilated and improved.  Knowledge is a powerful thing.  The more experience obtained, the more productive an employee can be.

 

Women Are More Likely To Be Team Players And Problem Solve

 

In the past, it seemed that a more masculine managerial style was preferred.  Male managers tend to be more commanding and task oriented, where women usually show more interest in interpersonal relationships and inclusive participation.   There has been a shift from the more masculine managerial style (similar to a dictatorship), to one where leaders strive to encourage connections and ingenuity, which comes more naturally to female managers. This shift in managerial strategies suggests that women may now have superior managerial skills that can more effectively contribute to overall company wide productivity.

 

Women Are Proficient At Developing Thriving Social Networks

 

Driven mostly by the ever evolving technology boom and the ease of access to mobile devices etc., social media has taken the world by storm.  Social networking in the workplace has proven to be important, both to women’s progression in the workforce and to company wide productivity. Women have always been good at building and maintaining relationships, and social media has only made that instinctive behavior more easily accessible.  Building positive, mutually beneficial relationships can contribute to increased productivity and cooperation in the workplace.

 

In summary, women are more educated, more teamwork oriented, better at team building, and more adept at problem solving.  These qualities are priceless to companies and organizations, and are key to a company’s overall productivity and economic success. 

 

So are women better than men or men better than women?  The answer is it depends, and I would be mistaken to make a broad-brush statement one way or the other.  The truth is each are unique and talented in their own way.  But when it comes to productivity… as you can see, we have some good evidence to show that women may be a step ahead!

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